Ten Great Interviews with Ellen Brown

Always in high demand as an interview subject, PBI founder and noted public banking advocate Ellen Brown has given hundreds of interviews. If you are with the media and are interested in interviewing her, or other public banking experts, visit our interview contacts page here. In the meantime, here are ten memorable interviews. 

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Mother Jones Catches Up to PBI on Link between Finance & Police Brutality

You heard it from us first, but it's good to know Mother Jones is taking up the cause. As Jack Hitt reports, every time you hear about police brutality, whether a shooting or an assault, you should ask yourself how the city or county that pays that cop is financing its operations and services. Are they employing cops as de facto tax collectors?

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TPP, MSNBC, Comcast and Using the Master's Tools

The headlines read "Donald Trump builds lead" . . . "No Plan B to Save Oceans" . . . Gwen Stafani and Gavin Rossdale Split" . . . "Puerto Rico Fails to Make $58 Million Debt Payment" Buried therein, news of Ed Schultz's sacking from MSNBC, the "liberal" news network owned by Comcast. Comcast is lobbying hard for a Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement that favors the media giant. Ed Schultz was the only personality on cable news television to oppose the Trans-Pacific Partnership. 

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The Bank-Banishment Campaign: News from Multiple Fronts

In May, Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase, Barclays, Royal Bank of Scotland and UBS Group AG pled guilty to felonies, while Swiss Bank had cooperated with federal authorities early on; all had manipulated international exchange rates and national currencies, ruining millions of lives. The federal government made them pay paltry fines. Nobody went to jail and no serious threat to any of those banks' profits exists.

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Greece: Two Morality Tales, One Scarcity Narrative

On the one hand, you have the Austerity Tale—essentially, that Greece needs to get with the (Eurozone) program. On the other, Greece, birthplace of democracy, taking whatever stand it can in defiance of a fundamentally undemocratic financial system—and demanding expanded support from Europe as a whole—a just demand given the demands integration had placed on Greece in the first place. Underlying both tales is the myth of financial scarcity. For whatever reason, Syriza is afraid (for I do not think them uninformed) of taking the most radical, surefire measures to take back Greece’s financial autonomy. Those solutions—public banks, sovereign issuance of currency and credit—would obviously stick a finger in the Eurozone’s eye, and would undoubtedly be met by regional and global elite pushback. But nations have survived worse. And, as I will say down at the end, I’m reluctant to condemn Syriza. They’re up against some real monsters, and the scarcity narrative is formidable.

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What Can Bolivia's Nature Rights Teach Us about Economic Rights and Public Banks

In December 2010, the Plurinational Legislative Assembly of Bolivia passed a body of law called Ley de Derechos de la Madre Tierra, or Law of the Rights of Mother Earth. The law contained ten articles, premised on the definition of the earth as a "collective subject of public interest." The earth, human communities, and ecosystems, are all designated titleholders of inherent legal rights. 

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Wells Fargo, Diversity, and Economic Justice

Religious conservatives are up in arms about a recent Wells Fargo commercial featuring a same-sex female couple meeting their new adopted daughter. Wells Fargo has admirably refused to pull the ad in the face of intimidation and threats of boycott and divestment by the evangelical conservative community.

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In North Dakota, Local News Shows Subtle Power of Public Bank

At PBI, we tend to cover a lot of global and national stories about the problems of private banking and its public alternatives. But some of the most important stories about the power of public banks are local. Two recent stories in the North Dakota media demonstrate what the Bank of North Dakota, the nation's only public bank, does for that state. 

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800 Years after Magna Carta, We’re Still Struggling with the King

Some things never change, and in a broad-brushed historical review one could reasonably say we’re still serfs -- slaves to debt acquired from the oligarchs of finance. This week’s 800th anniversary of the signing of the Magna Carta serves to remind us that creating new publicly-owned banks is a defining step toward breaking free from living in total subservience to privileged private parties.  Here are two birthday essays on the pivotal relevance of the Magna Carta to today’s struggles for justice and democracy:

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Banking: A Tale of Two States

by Jim Hannley

Arizonans for a New Economy (AzfNE) met with the board of directors of the Arizona Bankers Association (ABA) on April 15th in Tucson at the invitation of the ABA. Pamela Powers Hannley, Co-director of AzfNE presented slides to the board members showing banking trends in Arizona over the last 15 years. You can see all the data for that presentation, some of which I refer to in this post, here

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